MuseumsEnvironments

Terracotta Warriors

It’s not every day we get to recreate the warriors of ancient China’s first emperor. In fact, Chicago Scenic created six custom warriors for surprise appearances throughout the city. It was all part of The Field Museum of Natural History’s event as it welcomed nine of Emperor Qin Shihuang’s terracotta warriors into its exhibit, “China’s First Emperor and His Terracotta Warriors”. To maximize attention to the new exhibit, The Field Museum’s experiential agency, DDB Needham, created a three-week long “Spot A Warrior” campaign that featured six custom warriors that appeared throughout the city.

Chicago Scenic teamed with fiberglass partner Weber Group in Indiana to produce six 5.8-foot tall figures, all with different facial features and uniforms. Each warrior was made with extra attention to durability, since they were exposed to weeks of Chicago’s summer weather conditions. Once Weber Group completed fabricating the figures, they were shipped to Chicago Scenic where painters used scenic techniques to paint each figure, using small scale models to help them replicate intricate details. Each warrior was then attached to a custom three-foot square layered steel base, bringing each figure’s weight up to 375 pounds.

It’s not every day we get to recreate the warriors of ancient China’s first emperor. In fact, Chicago Scenic created six custom warriors for surprise appearances throughout the city. It was all part of The Field Museum of Natural History’s event as it welcomed nine of Emperor Qin Shihuang’s terracotta warriors into its exhibit, “China’s First Emperor and His Terracotta Warriors”. To maximize attention to the new exhibit, The Field Museum’s experiential agency, DDB Needham, created a three-week long “Spot A Warrior” campaign that featured six custom warriors that appeared throughout the city.

Chicago Scenic teamed with fiberglass partner Weber Group in Indiana to produce six 5.8-foot tall figures, all with different facial features and uniforms. Each warrior was made with extra attention to durability, since they were exposed to weeks of Chicago’s summer weather conditions. Once Weber Group completed fabricating the figures, they were shipped to Chicago Scenic where painters used scenic techniques to paint each figure, using small scale models to help them replicate intricate details. Each warrior was then attached to a custom three-foot square layered steel base, bringing each figure’s weight up to 375 pounds.

05.2016 back to MuseumsEnvironments