Corporate

Hot Wheels at Chicago Auto Show

The iconic bright orange 20-foot-tall swoop of Hot Wheels track, 75-feet-long and nearly 8-feet wide, was a fantasy playground come true for people who not only love cars but also playing with cars. GM’s booth at the Chicago Auto Show proved that only something this cool could signal the world premiere of the redesigned Chevrolet Camaro.

Chicago Scenic worked via 3-dimensional bending techniques, visualizing with concepts and then engineering for the ideal solution to deliver the spectacular Hot Wheels themed booth.

The set up was an off-axis, helical shape that kept employees at Chicago Scenic working nearly 24-hour shifts to complete, just days before the show opened its doors. Due to the tight timeframe, valued supplier Chicago Metal found extra-large aluminum sheets, then ran two shifts to create the complex shapes.  

During Super Bowl weekend, with a snow storm for added drama, Chicago Scenic’s staff welded, assembled, and painted the track, then transported it to Chicago’s McCormick Place. Onsite, CSSI’s team rigged the track by figuring out challenging support points and hanging points from the ceiling on cables. The goal achieved was an appearance as if the tracks were floating in space.

The iconic bright orange 20-foot-tall swoop of Hot Wheels track, 75-feet-long and nearly 8-feet wide, was a fantasy playground come true for people who not only love cars but also playing with cars. GM’s booth at the Chicago Auto Show proved that only something this cool could signal the world premiere of the redesigned Chevrolet Camaro.

Chicago Scenic worked via 3-dimensional bending techniques, visualizing with concepts and then engineering for the ideal solution to deliver the spectacular Hot Wheels themed booth.

The set up was an off-axis, helical shape that kept employees at Chicago Scenic working nearly 24-hour shifts to complete, just days before the show opened its doors. Due to the tight timeframe, valued supplier Chicago Metal found extra-large aluminum sheets, then ran two shifts to create the complex shapes.  

During Super Bowl weekend, with a snow storm for added drama, Chicago Scenic’s staff welded, assembled, and painted the track, then transported it to Chicago’s McCormick Place. Onsite, CSSI’s team rigged the track by figuring out challenging support points and hanging points from the ceiling on cables. The goal achieved was an appearance as if the tracks were floating in space.

02.2011 back to Corporate